Yoga On The Go

Yoga On The Go…

Easy tips to help you stay committed, consistent, and at home in your yoga practice when you’re abroad


The yoga sutras teach us that the level of achievement we will receive from our practice depends on the intensity with which we bring ourselves forth. Sutra 1:22 says The time necessary for success depends on whether the practice is mild, medium or intense. The Sutras also tell us that we must practice earnestly and consistently (Sutra 1.12). (The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, Sri Swami Satchidananda).

In other words, these practices only work when we do! Yoga requires us to sometimes put the practice first, to catch ourselves when we’re making excuses not to get on our mats, and to cultivate consistency and follow through amidst our busy lives. In the throws of weekly schedules, this task is already a challenge for some.

So, when things are really shaken up (like when there is family in town, and you just can’t get to class— or when you’re literally across the globe), how do you remain steadfast in your yoga ritual?

As a traveling yogi I have found a few helpful solutions to this conundrum… Throughout my career I have spent weeks at a time in hotel rooms in foreign countries, have woken up early for 5am flights, and have been sleep deprived and jet lagged before teaching 4 hours of workshops. The title may sound luxurious, but sometimes it takes all the gusto I’ve got just to keep going on with a smile. And the amazing thing is this: I could never do this without my practice. The act of coming to my mat, and into my heart by way of the breath…. there is no cup of coffee (even in Italy) that can do the same thing.

Here are my best tips to keep you consistent when you’re on the go. You can use these practices in your everyday life at home, when daily life is shaken up, or when you’re traveling short or long term.

  • Invest in a light weight yoga mat – Make sure you pack a mat in your bag! There are many travel mats that are under 1lb, and super easy to pack in a carry on. Make this item as necessary as your tooth brush. When you arrive in your hotel room, lay it out in a welcoming place as you are putting away your clothing and toiletries. When you wake up the next morning, step on your mat and commit to staying put for at least 15 minutes.

 

  • Keep your practice simple – Not sure what to do when you’re practicing on your own? Find familiar patterns of movement, and make those your ritual. Sun Salutations, Gentle Core Work, Supine Twists… Just begin moving, and see where your body takes you. If you are not confident creating your own flow, there are literally thousands of online and digital classes to follow along with! (I have a few here)!

 

  • It’s all about the breath – Whether you’re sitting still or scurrying through train depots, your breath is always, always, always available as an object for your awareness to settle upon. A simple breath technique to use on the go is the Box Breath. To perform this breath, inhale on a slow count of four, hold for a count of four, exhale for a count of four, and hold out for a count of four. Repeat up to 12 times. To help your mind remain centered on your breath, you can internally say to yourself, “Breathing In, Breathing Out,” with your in and out breaths respectively.

 

  • Ideal times to practice – Before you let your mind jump into planning mode, remind yourself to settle down and tune in! Practice first thing, only after using the bathroom and drinking some water. It can be challenging to get back to your mat once you allow yourself to carry on with the day. To avoid bypassing practice, make it your first and last activity of the day. The mind and body usually experience a bit of stress while traveling, making deep sleep more challenging and less satisfying. Restorative yoga before bed will combat the wear and tear of travel, and will help you to rest well.

 

  • Keep a journal handy – Svadhyaya (self study) is an integral part of the yoga practice. Journaling while you travel is a fabulous way to document novel experiences, and to keep track of your inner experience. When we travel we are faced with so much new information, thoughts, and ways of being all at once. Keeping a journal will help you to sort through and make sense of these impressions.

 

  • If nothing else, Meditate – If you have time for none of the above, take (at very minimum) five minutes in the morning and in the evening to practice sitting meditation. Set your timer, and commit to sitting with ease for just five minutes. Tune in, listen deeply, release the tension of the body, and feel your aliveness. Your body, your breath, and your awareness are beautiful miracles that deserve your attention (no matter how busy you are). If you need assistance in meditation, there are a number of apps and podcasts that are available free of charge.

 

….et Voila! You are all set to roam the globe without leaving your yoga practice at home. Your body, mind, heart, and yoga teachers will all be glad you remained consistent 🙂

And Remember: The outer and inner journeys are yours to explore, learn and grow from. Wherever your path takes you, enjoy the ride.

 

Namaste,

XO,

Stacy

How Fast Are You Aging?

Do you remember the first time you realized your body was “aging”?

Maybe it started in your thirties with a few more aches and pains in the morning. A tendency to get tired earlier in the day. The first signs of wrinkles around your eyes. A memory not quite as sharp as it used to be.

As the years have progressed, those little twinges have probably gotten more frequent. And if you’re like most people, you brushed it off as a “normal” part of the aging process… just something that happens when we get older.

The thing is, you don’t have to give in to the frailty, disease, and memory issues associated with aging. These symptoms are not “inevitable.” They are signals that your body needs something.

When it comes to aging, we’ve been fed a load of unsubstantiated assumptions our entire lives. But emerging research from top experts suggests that we can have all the advantages of youth, well into our later years.

That means a lean, strong, flexible body….supple, smooth skin….. a brain that is sharp… energy to last all day… and an immune system that provides powerful protection against illness.

We are a body-oriented culture. We judge ourselves by our appearance and our body’s ability to perform. When our bodies change—as they inevitably do—our self-worth goes with them, for better or for worse.

In Siddhartha, a novel about enlightenment and self-discovery the prince, Siddhartha, ventured out of his palace for the first time, he was shaken by his first glimpses of a person bent with age, a person wracked with illness and the body of a person who had died. Seeing the inevitable path of all our bodies to our final demise caused him to inquire into how he might transcend the suffering he had witnessed. This led him to realize that in order to transcend suffering, he had to transcend his attachment to and identification with the body. He had to look deeper, beyond the pleasures and suffering of the body, for lasting happiness.

This is what our yoga practice teaches us. Any person in a body who is practicing Yoga is living in a yoga body, regardless of age, build, gender or flexibility. And the deeper practices at the heart of Yoga—meditation—require a body simply as an anchor for awareness. 

I think most people when coming upon my age may scour, but I’m truly looking forward to the unfolding lessons, increasing self awareness and growing self love that comes with aging. I’m reminded that this is the start of a brand new year- and that there are still infinite opportunities for growth along my journey. Within every moment lies a miracle. And within every burden lies a blessing. 

Namaste~

Balancing the Chakras : A Simple Guide

Meditations, Mantras and Movement to Keep Your Chakras In Balance

What sets Yoga apart from other calisthenic routines?

The ancient yogis knew of something beyond the outer shell of movement- something deeper than muscles and bones- yet something just as important to shaping our physical health.

What they looked at and sought to keep healthy through their physical routine was the Chakra System.

So, what’s a… Chakra??

A Chakra (literally Wheel in Sanskrit) is an energy center or wheel of energetic movement in the body. It is part of the body’s subtle anatomy; and though subtle, has major effects on the gross, physical body and mind.

There are 7 major Chakras, which run along and align the spinal column, ranging from the base of the pelvic floor to the crown of the head.

Each of these 7 Chakras has a specific energetic and emotional quality, associated color, sound, and deeper meaning.

Often when we feel out of balance- angry, saddened, over-whelmed, exhausted- it is a sign that our deeper, more subtle self is in need of some serious restoration. Therefore, a great way to target the root of our imbalances is to look at the Chakras, and bring them back into balance first.

Below, you’ll find a simple guide to the Chakras, and how to bring them back into balance:

MULADHARA (ROOT CHAKRA):

Location: At the base of the spinal column, centered in the Pelvic Floor / Energetic Qualities: Stability, Security, Safety, Fear & Fearlessness / When you’re out of balance: You may feel unsafe and fear-laden

Bring back into balance with:

Meditation: Lying on your back, with your hands on your low belly, imagine red light charging through your spine down to the base, igniting new life and energy with each breath.

Mantra: “I fearlessly take on the challenges of life. Trusting my inner-guide, I face the unknown with love.”

Movement: Utkata Konasana (Goddess Pose). This posture requires strength, poise, and confidence. Open your heart wide and feel the power of your lower body. Breathe deeply all the way into the Pelvic Floor.

 

SVADISTHANA (SACRAL CHAKRA):

Location: Just above the pubic bone, below the naval / Energetic Qualities: Creativity, Sexual Energy, Personal Expression / When you’re out of balance: You may feel “stuck” or uninspired

Bring back into balance with:

Meditation: Practice simple seated meditation, follow your breath and soothe your mind into stillness. Creativity is the product of a clear mind. Sometimes just finding some peace and quiet is all you need.

Mantra: “I am available for creativity to flow through me with abundance and ease. I reflect the creation of all life, and recognize the gift of creation within me.”

Movement: Virabhadrasana (Warrior Pose). This posture requires strength and ease, and challenges the muscles of the pelvic floor and abdomen to maintain a long, supple spine. It sparks awareness and stillness. Root firmly, and maintain a soft gaze.

 

MANIPURA (SOLAR PLEXUS CHAKRA):

Location: At the Solar Plexus, between the naval and the breast bone / Energetic Qualities: Personal Power, Will, Decision Making / When you’re out of balance: You may feel uncertain, weary, uneasy about a decision

Bring back into balance with:

Meditation: Practice Kapalabhati Breath (Skull Shining Breath). Breathe in deeply through the nose into the belly, let out quick exhalations through the nose, as the navel “snaps” back toward the spine. Before trying this on your own, ask a teacher for proper instruction and safety guides!

Mantra: Simply state, “I am” with each inhalation. With each exhalation, bring your awareness to your physical presence, stating “here”.

Movement: Plank Pose. Yes, a simple posture to refine your core muscles and define the strength of your abdomen. Gently draw your navel toward the spine, reaching through your crown, broadening across your chest, and pressing out through your heels.

 

ANAHATA (HEART CHAKRA):

Location: At the heart center / Energetic Qualities: Loving-Kindess, Acceptance of Self and Others, Compassion / When you’re out of balance: You may feel unloved or unloving, disconnected, impatient

Bring back into balance with:

Meditation: Simple sitting, with hands on your heart. Breathe into your heart space, filling it up with air and letting it flow out. Practice until you feel your chest and shoulders softened and available to move freely.

Mantra: Loving-Kindness “May my heart be filled with loving kindness, may I be well, may I be peaceful and at ease, may I be happy”

Movement: Ustrasana (Camel Pose). This backbend opens the heart, strengthens the back muscles and invites you to breathe into the chest and ribs. Keep the neck and throat soft, and use the stability and strength of your legs to ground.

 

VISHUDDHA (THROAT CHAKRA):

Location: In the throat / Energetic Qualities: Verbal Expression, Speaking our Highest Truth, Communication / When you’re out of balance: You may feel unable to say what you need to, afraid to share your truth

Bring back into balance with:

Meditation: Recite “AUM” with clarity, taking equal time to pronounce each sound “A-U-M”. Don’t be afraid to make noise! The point is to hear yourself, and to get past the discomfort of opening up.

Mantra: “I speak my truth with confidence and clarity. I listen deeply to myself and to others, and communicate with ease.”

Movement: Matsyasana (Fish Pose). Try this assisted with two blocks, one underneath the scapula, and one supporting the head. Lengthen through your toes, and allow your throat space to open as you relax the face and breathe.

 

AJNA (THIRD EYE CHAKRA): 

Location: Just at the Pineal Gland (Third Eye), set between the brow bones / Energetic Qualities: Insight and Intuition / When you’re out of balance: You may feel lost or untrusting of yourself

Bring back into balance with:

Meditation: With eyes closed, bring your inner awareness to the place between your brow. Keep your inner gaze alive and bright, as practice maintaining focus on this area.

Mantra: “I am connected, at peace, and present.”

Movement: Balasana (Child’s Pose). Allow your head to rest fully, either on the floor, or on a bolster or block. Soften the muscles of the face, and allow the gently pressure of the position bring your awareness to your third eye.

 

SAHASWARA (CROWN CHAKRA):

Location: At the crown of the head, rising up like a “Thousand Petal Lotus Flower” / Energetic Qualities: Trust in your Highest Self, Connection to Self, to all things, and ultimately to the Essence of your True Nature / When you’re out of balance: You may feel lonely, unsupported or irrelevant

Bring back into balance with:

Meditation: Practice inhaling and exhaling bright white light in through your crown. Inhale, white light filters in the body all the way down the spine. Exhale, white light leaves through the crown, shooting back out and creating a field around you.

Mantra: “AUM. I am one with all that is.”

Movement: Sirsasana (Headstand). Please consult a yoga instructor before attempting this posture. Grow through the spine, reach the tail and the toes upward. Use your foundation wisely, planting the forearms/hands firmly into the earth. Breathe deeply into the body, and keep a soft gaze.

 

 

Happy Balancing, Yogis!

With Love + Namaste,

Stacy

 

 

Yoga Progressions & Regressions

Yoga Is For Every Body

How to create All-Levels Yoga Classes that offer an inclusive practice environment, so that the beginner feels safe and the advanced student feels challenged… the secret is mastering Yoga Progressions & Regressions.

In my time as a yoga practitioner and teacher, one thing I’ve noticed is this… that no yoga class is attended by an exclusive type of “Yogi”. There is no such thing as One Practice Fits All, or one body type that comes to practice. Physical ability, knowledge of the practice, and style of training differ person to person– and it’s likely that if you’re teaching today, you’re getting students of all different levels attending your classes.

So, as yoga teachers, how can we make ourselves available to each student that joins us?

In my experience, it’s been learning how to master the progressions and regressions of each pose. In doing so, I’ve been able to meet the needs of “all-level” Vinyasa classes, while maintaining the pace and rhythm of the class-flow.

Everyone gets what they need, and the room becomes an inclusive place for practice.

Seems easy enough… but how do we teach progressions and regressions throughout class, without “disrupting the flow” of practice?

Here are a few key notes that have helped me to do just this:

  • In class, I always demonstrate two to three variations of a posture. It is an effective way to meet the needs of all levels in attendance- beginning students will usually stick with the more simple variation, while advanced students will be instructed to enter more complex poses safely, from the foundation.
  • During pre-class announcements, communicate that because there are various levels in the class, each student should be mindful of one’s own body and to choose a level that fits one’s current physical ability. There is no “right” or “wrong” expression of the pose- only “safe” or “unsafe” for each body. Encourage students to make use of props to support their practice (blocks to provide greater stability in balance poses, straps to extend the reach of arms in forward folds, etc.).
  • Encourage students to find & apply for themselves Sthira Sukham Asanam (Sutra 2:46), or a balance steadiness and comfort in each pose. Pushing past edges is imperative to growth, but we don’t want to do so in a way that damages the body or mind. Move in a way that promotes staying clear, conscious and compassionate about what is happening physically- and on every level of your being.

The following is an example of a safe and effective way to teach the progression of a posture:

Garudasana (Eagle Pose)

Notice that the posture moves from its most simple variation, to most complex. Even if the student chooses to take the most complex variation, have them move progressively through the steps, so that they better understand the basic mechanics and foundation of the pose.

Step One: Stand with feet crossed, side by side. The opposite arm of the “top leg” will cross underneath. If students have tight shoulders, and the forearm bind is not accessible, have them hold around the outer shoulders and draw the elbows away from the heart.

Step Two: Press into the feet firmly so the legs feel a gentle “squeezing” action, lift from the pelvic floor and lengthen the spine. Focus the Gaze toward the thumbs, as you spread across the collar bones and hug in the frontal rib cage.

Step Three: Should you choose to balance on one leg, come to a cross legged “sitting” position. First the foot can act as a kickstand on the opposite side. Perhaps the outer foot can make contact with the base leg’s outer calf. Be mindful of the base knee- it shouldn’t wobble to either side.

Step Four: If you’re able to balance here with ease, and your mobility allows, try the full bind of the foot behind the calf of the base leg. The same actions as in Step Two should still apply!

If anywhere along the line of progression you feel any pain, severe discomfort in body, challenge maintaining breath or balance, simply regress back to a more foundational variation of the pose… and as always, remember to breathe. 

And Remember! Progressions in practice don’t necessarily have to do with how deep you can get into a posture, or whether or not you can stick a handstand, or sit in padmasana (lotus pose). The physical practice of yoga is about challenging our minds and thoughts, so that we may better understand what is going on mentally and spiritually. The body is doorway to our deeper selves, and when we learn to listen to the body, we will make progress naturally. 

With Love,

Stacy McCarthy

@YogaNamaStacy

 

Don’t Skip Savasana!

Don’t Skip Savasana!! (And other ways you should actively Chill Out)…

When’s the last time you took a deep breath that soothed your entire being? The last time you slowed down on purpose? The last time you remember feeling fully restored?

If lifelong health is something you’re seeking, these are important questions to ask yourself.

Getting proper rest can help you to manage and balance your energy levels, maintain mental clarity, recover after workouts, effectively reduce inflammation, transform your digestive health, and more!!

Resting properly means more than just sleeping 8 hours a night. Rest and recovery is an active process that requires deep listening and mindful attentiveness- it is the process of slowing down enough so that you actually can tune into your breath, your thoughts, and your sensations… It means staying for savasana at the end of a yoga class, taking a 10 minute meditation break during your busy work day, eating mindfully without your cellphone to distract you, and doing a few soothing yoga postures to help your body rest without tension at the end of the day.

If you’ve ever tried to slow down on purpose, you may have found that it’s actually pretty darn challenging. But like all things, with practice comes improvement.

Below you’ll find my favorite ways to Rest and Restore my Body and Mind:

1. Don’t Skip Savasana!

 We often associate working out to our max with gaining health, perfecting our bodies and getting out toxins. But rest and recovery are equally important… Resting not only helps the body and mind to be in peace, but helps both to actively recover and assimilate the benefits of your more intense physical practice… Savasana is the perfect example of active rest. After practice, we honor the work we’ve done and we allow the body to reap the rewards of our effort. It is a way to say “thank you” to the body, a way to give it time to soak in the goodness, and an opportunity to let the mind be quiet. For many, it’s the only time of their day to completely let go. So, next time you’re thinking of skipping out on savasana, don’t do it! It’s well worth the extra 5-10 minutes of your time.

2. Put Your Feet Up

Put your feet up! One of my favorite ways to relax my body after a full day of activity is to gently invert. Our feet carry much tension within them, especially after standing, walking, and even sitting all day. Putting your feet up not only helps to ease the tension of the feet and legs, but helps to regulate blood flow and the flow of lymphatic fluids. It also gives a sense of ease and serenity to the body and mind, literally making that “Ahhhhhh” feeling come alive. So, next time you’re exhausted, sore, fatigued or grumpy, put your feet up 🙂 Try Viparita Karani (legs all the way up the wall), or simply rest your feet above your hips on the couch.

Here is a more enhanced version of Legs Up The Wall Pose, or Viparita Karani. To intensify the sensation and benefit, lift your hips with a bolster and add a little weight on top of the feet. This version offers the additional benefit of lifting the hips above the line of the heart and head, giving a greater boost to your circulation and the flow of lymphatic fluids. Don’t forget the most important part: relax and breathe!

3. The Pose of A Child

 Balasana, the Pose of A Child. One of my all time favorites! This posture not only calms the nervous system and relaxes major points of tension in the hips and spine, but regulates the heart rate circulation, gently massages the internal organs and promotes full, luscious breathing. This supported version adds in relief to the neck and shoulders, and also allows those with less hip flexibility to rest in the pose with ease. Try it for 5 minutes before bed, or before your workout to begin feeling the flow of oxygen through your body. Notice how you feel before, during, and after the pose.

4. Take A Walk 

Every night, my favorite way to decompress is to take my dogi Yogi for a walk. Not only does it get his wiggles out, it soothes me completely. Being in nature satisfies our human need to connect to the Earth, and to ourselves. It offers me time to let my thoughts go as I focus on the simple things- the color of the flowers, the light shining through the trees, the crispness of the fresh sea breeze. Studies have proven that being outdoors provides a slew of health benefits, like: grounding (to receive the negative ions from the Earth- go barefoot!), improved sleep, better eyesight, and enhanced physiological and psychological wellbeing. Even just a 20 minute walk a day will do!

5. Go Within

Taking the time to go within is, I think, the most important thing one can do for herself. Over the year, it is what has kept me self aware and less affected by challenges and toxins. It is in the process of meditation  that my mind and body relax so that I can observe the habitual feelings and thoughts that arise, follow the flow of my breath in and out of my body, notice if I body wants to fidget or if I can relax completely in the process…There really is so much to observe, that it may not actually feel very relaxing at first! But over time, with patience, with ease and with respect for Self, there is a beautiful quietude that arises, almost spontaneously. It is here where the greatest rest and restoration takes place within.

With Love + Namaste,

Happy Resting, Yogis!

Stacy

Is Yoga Suppose to be Fun?

Twenty-five years ago, I began practicing yoga. I came to the mat to release the stress of years of competitive athletics and pressure of starting a new company. At first, there was an excitement of looking forward to the next class, wondering what new pose I would discover. Everything was an adventure. It was like a new relationship with someone you were falling in love with, the honeymoon stage where both of you are displaying your best characteristics. The practice continued that way for quite a long time, a ritual of spending time with myself, moving my body and focusing inward, being in the present moment.  Everything was fresh, fun and exciting. But like relationships, my yoga experience eventually reached some obstacles, injuries and time commitment. Something began to shift and I started to feel that this is work, it’s not so fun any more.  “Do I have to practice again today?”  It can be a very disheartening place, to look at something that once was so exciting and now no longer brings you the same sense of adventure and excitement.  This is where I had a decision to make. What is my yoga going to be for me?  Breakthrough!  This was an amazing place to be.  Yoga was no longer a ride that I was being taken on but a path I chose to walk.  This is when my yoga began an amazing transformation from providing entertainment to providing opportunities for personal evolution.  I  decided at that moment that this is more than yoga poses and personal time, that this is a lifestyle commitment I wanted to make, that this practice is something that extends beyond the mat and the time that I am on it. I was being drawn into this practice because I knew there was work I needed to continue.

For whatever reason you are brought to yoga, maybe to heal an old injury, relieve stress or were dragged into class by an enthusiastic friend for fun, if you practice consistently and long enough, it inevitably develops beyond the initial intention.  As we approach obstacles in the practice that feel like work, how do we maintain a regular practice when it is no longer fun? Is yoga supposed to be fun?  It’s something to think about, but I think it is more important to evaluate fun with regards to the yoga practice. I prefer to use the word joyful. Fun can sometimes border on the word “entertaining” or even “silly”. Definitely we can find joy in our yoga practice. And more importantly we will receive from our yoga what we are willing to put into it.  We can have a devotional experience by bringing devotion to our mat.  We can have a fun class by bringing an attitude of joy and a lighthearted approach.  Just because the yoga has become something that is transformative and about self-study it doesn’t mean that we need to drown in seriousness.  What it means is that we become the CEO of our yoga and begin to develop a grander perspective of what brings joy and contentment on the mat.  It is no longer about trying some elaborate new pose, although sometimes that is still there, but joy is found in discovering that over the course of time and practice we have come to know ourselves at a deeper, more profound level and grown into better versions of our self. When we receive this type of compensation, we are much more willing to do the daily work, to approach these obstacles with joy and an open heart because we know what is possible to be found on the other side. We learn that we need the discipline, but we also are happy to give ourselves those practices that are just about having fun. We need moments to experience the result of our efforts, and acknowledge the growth and self awareness gained through yoga. Through our disciplined and challenging practices, we appreciate the playful, fun practices where everything just feels good.

Wherever you are on your yoga journey, in the honeymoon stage or in a blossoming yoga marriage, remember that no practice is perfect and the road isn’t always smooth. For this journey, you’ll need patience, poise and lots of practice, just like a long, successful marriage. So, hold on tight, you’re about to take the ride of your life.

5 sure fire-giveaways that you’re a dedicated Yogi

Recently I was taking a class in LA and I watched the most focused yogi ever:

This yogi was sitting in padmasana against a wall

waiting for class to begin.

A few feet away from this yogi, is a very Famous and Attractive

Actress (F.A.A.) trying to get his attention.

Not only does he NOT EVEN LOOK

at F.A.A.,… He doesn’t even appear

to physically HEAR F.A.A.

He’s so immersed in the moment… Focused

on his breath… That not even one of the

worlds most beautiful women can distract him.

Watching this got me thinking…

It never takes longer than 60 seconds

to tell the difference between a Dedicated Yogi (D.Y.)

and a fly by night yogi (F.B.N.)

And having taught thousands of students and trained hundreds of teachers,

I’ve noticed a few sure fire giveaways between the

students who get it – and the students who

fall off the mat entirely.

Here’s 5:

#1:

A F.B.N. Yogi will complain that she doesn’t have

a studio or the props to train.

 

A Dedicated Yogi will find a place to practice at all costs… Even when it means

practicing with chaos around you  –

Or using no equipment except your body and your breath.

 

—————————————–

“I had my first baby and I tried to go to a yoga class, but my baby was too young to attend childcare at the studio. I don’t have any yoga props at home, but I turned the phone off and put in your Busy Mom Yoga DVD with my newborn nearby. Still the best Yoga practice I’ve ever done, even now that my newborn is a toddler!!!”

Jennifer Davidson

Dedicated Yogi and Peaceful Mom

– —————————————–

#2:

F.B.N. Yogi’s will complain they need to be in a hot room, not to be in a hot room, have music playing, not have music playing, have a teacher, have only a particular teacher.

 

A Dedicated Yogi will not make excuses of why they can’t practice, no matter

what the reason is. They will be okay with life’s ebbs and flow. They will accept life’s ups and downs and do their practice anyway.

 

—————————————–

“I started practicing with you back at the beginning of January. As I followed you from Hot Yoga studios, to College Yoga Classes to Ashtanga Classes at a Sports Resort I learned to maintain the ritual and cultivation of a regular practice without the attachment to one environment. I’ve learned to work towards my goals but view my practice everyday with new eyes.

–       Justine Lu

Yogi cultivating a regular practice

—————————————–

 

#3:

F.B.N. Yogi’s will blame their injuries on yoga poses.

…And give up entirely. They’ll say that “chatarunga hurt their shoulder or

padmasana (lotus pose) hurt their knee”. They’ll demonize the pose instead of admitting…

It is you doing yoga postures wrong or pushing yourself into poses you are not ready for that is the problem.

 

A Dedicated Yogi will look at their injury, and say this:

“I need to let my ego go and modify my practice. I may not be able to do everything I use to, but I have a bigger picture I’m working towards and this set back is temporary”.

 

—————————————–

“I have a group of friends that I started yoga with several years ago, now only a couple of us still have a regular yoga practice. The excuses were many, they wanted  to try the latest exercise craze or they were to hyper for yoga or they kept getting injured. I’ve heard you say there is always someone out there with a disciplined yoga practice, transforming from the inside out when others are jumping from the latest exercise craze searching for something outside themselves, searching to change their physical shell. I am that person staying committed to my yoga practice through all the highs and lows of physical and mental discomfort.

The transformation for me continues to evolve physically, mentally and spiritually and I’ve never felt so grounded and content in my life.

Jesica Murphy

Yogi calming a monkey mind

—————————————–

 

#4:

F.B.N. Yogi’s will claim they don’t have

enough TIME to get their practice in, read inspiring texts

daily, and stay on top of their responsibilities.

 

A Dedicated Yogi will say that she doesn’t have enough time either.

Then she’ll just get up earlier.

 

—————————————–

“Since I’m in college and work on

the weekends, it’s tough to get my yoga practice in

– especially with exams almost every week.

 

So I wake up at 5:45 am to get on my mat

and although it’s tough, I persevere

because I can feel and see the difference.

It’s this discipline that has given me a

Powerful Body and a Peaceful Mind”

 

– Tracy McFarland

Dedicated Yogi

—————————————–

 

And finally, #5:

 

F.B.N. Yogi’s will push themselves for a couple months,

and say that it’s “too hard.”

 

Dedicated Yogi’s will challenge themselves but will

work at a rate that’s safe and say it’s challenging.

And then continue to practice & modify as needed

until the practice becomes easy.

 

Dedicated Yogis will get results like this:

 

—————————————–

“Stacy I struggled with my stomach for years after having four children.  Your teaching physically changed my body.  My stomach is finally flat and strong, my back is muscular, and overall my body is firm and toned. I have a greater awareness of my body, how I carry myself, and my posture outside of yoga. And I’m more present with my children and loving to my husband.”

–       Patti Lorne

Dedicated Yogi, Wife and Mom

—————————————–

Now it’s up to you to decide which results

YOU want.

Fly By Night Yogi…

Or Dedicated Yogi.

The choice is yours.

 https://www.yoganamastacy.com

Stacy

 

“The Payoff of Discipline in your Yoga Practice”

August tends to be the month when I see a drop in the number of students attending classes & slacking off on the discipline that it takes to get the desired results they want.
You may have notice how quickly the body becomes stiff or weak from a lack of balanced movement that you benefit from in your yoga practie. When you become stiff or weak from a lack of balanced movement the long term result can be a body that starts to store fear & no longer moves freely & without pain.  An unbalanced body can create a cascade of problems from weight gain to no longer having the confidence to do the things you once did.
Read more

Fill Your Yoga Practice Now! Exclusive Live Event

Fill Your Yoga Practice Now! Exclusive Live Yoga Business Coaching Event Stacy McCarthy & Stephanie Tait Founders, Yoga School of Business
Nowadays, realizing success as a yoga teacher doesn’t just start and end with a good class. You have to know how to run and grow your business if you really want to be able to teach full-time, make a decent living at it, and balance out your personal life.

During this one day live yoga business coaching event, you will learn how to grow your practice though some of the most effective business growth tools and strategies available specifically for the unique needs and desires of yoga teachers.

You’ll start the day with Stacy’s signature “Fire Up Flow” Asana Class & end the day with a “Business Breakthrough” Restorative Yoga Class.

In this Live Coaching Event, you’ll learn how to:

1. Develop a Marketing Strategy as unique and in integrity as you are (without having to spend money buying more “stuff” to help you market yourself.

2. Master How to Talk About Who You Are & What You Do in a way that attracts more ideal students to practice with you and grows your practice.

3. Discover Your Niche – your unique place in the whole yoga field where you have the greatest potential to really stand out in the fast growing yoga field. Create a truly abundant practice & enjoy the personal rewards of building a career in this field.

Program Details:

Program Material Sent to You On-Demand.
Within 24 hours of your registration & payment, you will receive about 4 hours of rich pre-recorded program content to empower you to create an abundant yoga practice. This material is delivered to you in a format like a private, online presentation by your master teachers, Stacy and Stephanie. All you will you have to do is click on the link provided, and the online presentation will run right from your computer, whenever you are ready for it.

During the Live Event, you’ll deepen your understanding of the materials, practice what you’ve learned, & receive direct feedback about how you are going to apply it to grow your practice.
Program Material Sent to You In-Print.
The contents of online presentation will also be sent to you in downloadable PDF, so you can print it out separately to study when you are not at your computer.

Date, Time, Location
Date: Saturday, March 27th
Time: 12:00 – 6:00pm
Location: The Yoga Mandiram @ 2121 Newcastle #E, Cardiff By the Sea, CA.

Investment:
If you sign up by Wednesday, March 17th @ midnight, this live yoga business coaching event will only cost you only $129.95 + tax. Registrations after March 17th are $159.95 + tax.
Don’t miss out on this exclusive opportunity to fill your yoga practice NOW! Accelerate the results you are seeing from all your efforts to grow your practice
Register Here!