A Yogi’s Super Rich Path

Russell Simmon’s, Music, Fashion & Film Mogul just released his new book, Super Rich: A Guide to Having it All Below is an excerpt from Yahoo Finance today about how Russell Simmons gained his millions through the inner peace he found after 15 years of yoga and meditation.

Russell Simmons’ Top Principles to Super Richness

#1 Give Your Talents Until They Can’t Live Without It

“Wake up in the morning and find out what you want to give as opposed to what you want to get,” he says. “Through this practice of becoming a good giver you become a good getter.”

Simmons gives examples of many of his former selfless, tireless and upaid interns that went on to greatness, including Sean Combs, Kevin Liles, and Julie Greenwald, recently named COO of Atlantic Records Group.

“Those who focus on being good servants usually attract the most in the end,” he says.

Basically, offer your talents and skills for free and the rewards will find you.

#2 Relentlessly Pursue Your Goals Without Appearing Needy

Simmons’ law of attraction says: “when you chase things, they will always run from you.”

This principle goes hand-in-hand with principle number one by virtue of the more you give, the more good that will just find you.

#3 If You Don’t Love it, Leave it Alone

This is not only the idea that you should do what you love and a wealth of richness will follow, but the idea that you should only do things you are “karmically” comfortable doing.

“People can sell anything,” from bombs to drugs, he says, even though there are very serious ramifications to those actions. “I want to stress that making money just for the sake of getting paid is a pedestrian activity that you can rise above.”

If you don’t love it, don’t do it.

#4 Let Go of the Results

“You really have no control over the results, you have control over the action,” he says. “So make sure you perform your action and your duty well.”

In the accompanying clip, he explains that he has no recollection of his very first paycheck, but says he certainly does remember making his first good record.

“All I could think is ‘when my friends hear this record’ it will make them so happy,” he reminisces. “Do things you love. Do things that you have faith will make other people happy and that will give back what you give them.”

#5 Get Open

“You want to always be open, creative and fluid as possible, and never become rigid, old or tight,” he writes, encouraging readers to let loose and lower your defenses.

The Joy of Giving

Simmons’ list of his successes are deep but the endeavors most important to him may be those that go along with his first principle listed above. The idea of being a “good giver.”

He is known globally for not only his business acumen, but also his commitment to philanthropy. Simmons has devoted an entire division of empire to charity and non-profit work.

A yogis guide to Super Rich

Is Yoga A Religion?

Is Yoga A Religion?


Every so often, I will be at a social event and someone will introduce me to his or her friends as their yoga teacher and the friend will ask, “So do you study Hinduism or Buddhism?” There is an assumption that because of the use of Sanskrit words, chanting, or the study of ancient yogic texts such as Patanjali’s Yoga Sutra that yoga has a religious affiliation.

According to T.K.V. Desikachar, a prominent yogi credited with being a driving force behind the resurgence of Hatha yoga in recent decades, “Yoga is not a religion and should not affiliate with any religion”. Yoga has no religious obligations, no singular creed and it has no rituals that profess a faith such as baptism or confirmation.

So, if yoga is not a “religion” is it a hobby, a sport, an exercise routine, or a discipline such as the study of medicine or martial arts? In some ways, yoga represents all these things and more.

Many students come initially to yoga for the many health benefits. Eventually with regular practice, many find the meditative effects on the mind and emotions can become a spiritual experience.

So then, what is spirituality?

Some equate spirituality with praying, meditating or even reading enlightening literature. In its basic form, it’s your level of consciousness. It’s the way you get in synch with yourself, connecting with who you are on a deeper level. It’s the connection to our inner self. If religion could be referred to as the external frame or organizational structure for it’s congregations, then spirituality would be the internal connection and understanding of one’s self and their place in the universe.

Yoga puts us in touch with this inner self, no matter our outer beliefs.